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Many regions are projected to experience an increase in the probability of compound events with higher global warming (high confidence). In particular, concurrent heatwaves and droughts are likely to become more frequent.
—Valérie Masson-Delmotte and Panmao Zhai, “Regional trends in extreme events in the IPCC 2021 report”

The Celts believed a tree’s presence could be felt more keenly at night or after a heavy rain, and that certain people were more attuned to trees and better able to perceive them. There is a special word for this recognition of sentience, mothaitheacht. It was described as a feeling in the upper chest of some kind of energy or sound passing through you. It’s possible that mothaitheacht is an ancient expression of a concept that is relatively new to science: infrasound or “silent” sound. These are sounds pitched below the range of human hearing, which travel great distances by means of long, loping waves. They are produced by large animals, such as elephants, and by volcanoes. And these waves have been measured as they emanate from large trees.
—Diana Beresford-Kroeger,
To Speak for the Trees

It is the balance between the rational and imaginative that will ultimately solve the most serious problems that threaten us.
—David Dunn

 

There’s a tree I see in my mind when I need to find shelter. This Douglas fir tree lives on an island in the northwest, and simultaneously this tree lives inside me. It’s one of the few remaining old-growth trees on the island. I’ve sat inside the burned-out cave at its base where lightning struck. I’ve watched light glitter across strands of spider silk spanning its entrance, breathing cool air and smelling damp earth, bark, and wood. Inside the tree, I am young and old and animal and human. I am held inside the slow language of xylem, phloem, cambium, sap, and centuries of survival. When I approach the tree as I walk on the duff trail around the border of the lake, I feel the tree’s voice move like water through my chest. The voice of the tree is a hush, a swell, a silent rolling wave like the slow rising of a whale.